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Radiation levels in Marshall Islands higher than Fukushima, Chernobyl, study finds

FOXNews.com Tuesday, 16 July 2019
Radiation levels across the Marshall Islands in the central Pacific Ocean, where the United States conducted more than 65 nuclear tests during the Cold War, are still alarmingly high — even higher than Fukushima and Chernobyl in some parts, a new study shows.
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News video: New Report Finds Radiation In Parts Of Marshall Islands Is Higher Than Chernobyl

New Report Finds Radiation In Parts Of Marshall Islands Is Higher Than Chernobyl 00:57

An alarming report sheds light on the radiation levels in some parts of the Marshall Islands.

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