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"Don't Be Evil" author on the power of Big Tech

CBS News Friday, 8 November 2019
Google was founded with the corporate motto: "Don't be evil." Now that phrase serves as the title of a new book that explores how Big Tech has strayed from its original path and exploited its users in the process. Rana Foroohar, author of "Don't Be Evil: How Big Tech Betrayed Its Founding Principles – and All of Us," joined CBSN to discuss the industry's powerful impact on society.
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Big Tech Big Tech Collective term for large technology companies including Google, Amazon, Facebook, Apple, and Microsoft

Trump-led conservatives accuse Big Tech of election interference, escalate bias charges ahead of Senate showdown

At a Capitol Hill hearing, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Twitter's Jack Dorsey and Google's Sundar Pichai will face charges they censor conservatives.

USATODAY.com

What Big Tech can expect from next administration

Tech companies fear that a "blue wave" would bring more lawsuits, data privacy laws or even new enforcement agencies.
CBS News
House panel issues scathing Big Tech complaint [Video]

House panel issues scathing Big Tech complaint

The U.S. House of Representatives antitrust subcommittee's findings on abuse of market power by four large tech companies took Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Alphabet's Google to task in a scathing take-down for what the committee saw as a gross abuse of power aimed at squelching competition. Conway G. Gittens reports.

Credit: Reuters - Politics    Duration: 01:58Published
EU looks to curb powers of Big Tech with new Digital Services Act [Video]

EU looks to curb powers of Big Tech with new Digital Services Act

The Digital Services Act, which is expected to be in place by the end of this year, is the first big overhaul of European internet regulation for two decades.View on euronews

Credit: euronews (in English)    Duration: 03:47Published

Google Google American technology company

Made by Google products go green with recycled materials [Video]

Made by Google products go green with recycled materials

Google announced that it has achieved one of its goals of using recycled materials in all of its Made by Google products. The company had pledged to achieve the goal by 2022 but have announced that they have achieved it early, The Verge reported. According to Google sustainability systems architect David Bourne, all the new Pixel and Nest products are now designed with recycled materials. That's not to say its products are made entirely of recycled materials, but they at least include recycled materials somewhere in the product. The back cover of the Pixel 5 is made with 100 per cent recycled aluminium, and the new Nest Audio has 70 per cent recycled plastic, with the sustainable fabric cover it introduced with the Nest Mini last year. And on the newest Nest Thermostat, the trim plate (the part that attaches to the wall) is made from post-consumer recycled plastic, informed Google."Google's focus on incorporating recycled materials in our hardware design not only supports our sustainability commitments but also enables our supply chain partners to confidently invest in and develop these types of materials so that the wider consumer electronics industry can use them too," Bourne said in a statement. The company said in September it would run its operations carbon-free by 2030 and that it had purchased enough carbon offsets to cancel out the company's carbon dioxide emissions since its founding in 1998. And starting Monday, it will continue to keep "all shipping of Made by Google hardware to and from direct customers 100 per cent carbon neutral."It further said of working toward achieving zero-waste-to-landfill certification at all of its final assembly manufacturing sites by 2022, meaning the majority of waste from those operations will be recycled, stated The Verge.

Credit: ANI    Duration: 01:13Published
Facebook enters cloud gaming with different services than competitors [Video]

Facebook enters cloud gaming with different services than competitors

Facebook has entered the field of cloud-based gaming service and on October 26 introduced cloud games to its existing Facebook Gaming application. The tech giant's cloud gaming services differs from those offered by competitors Amazon or Google, which both offer standalone cloud gaming services for a fee, The Verge reported. "We are doing free-to-play games, we're doing games that are latency-tolerant, at least to start," said Jason Rubin, Facebook's vice president of play. "We're not promising 4K, 60fps, so you pay us $6.99 per month. We're not trying to get you to buy a piece of hardware, like a controller." According to Rubin, the reason Facebook is exploring the cloud is because it opens up the types of games it can offer. The company started out in games more than a decade ago with Flash-based hits like FarmVille before moving to HTML5 for its Instant Games platform, but both of those technologies are relatively limited to smaller, simpler experiences. Facebook's approach to cloud gaming is quite different philosophically from competitors like Google Stadia or Amazon's Luna. The company isn't hyping up its technology or trying to secure big exclusive games. Instead, it feels like more of an extension of what Facebook already offers: quick, easy-to-pick-up titles that can fill up some idle moments in your day, The Verge reported. Similarly, while the focus right now is on free-to-play games, he said, "There may come a day when it makes sense for us to offer a premium game." But the company wanted to start out by making it as easy as possible to play these games. Free is usually pretty easy.

Credit: ANI    Duration: 01:13Published

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