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The politics of resentment and how meritocracy divides Americans

CBS News Thursday, 17 September 2020
Author and Harvard professor Michael Sandel joins CBSN to discuss the nation's polarized political landscape, and how President Trump was able to tap into the politics of resentment during the 2016 election. His new book is called “The Tyranny of Merit: What’s Become of the Common Good?”
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