United States  

Celebrating 10 Years of Trusted News Discovery
One News Page
> >

Can We Win The Battle Against Climate Change?

Video Credit: SWNS STUDIO - Duration: 01:05s - Published < > Embed
Can We Win The Battle Against Climate Change?

Can We Win The Battle Against Climate Change?

Climate change will soon reach a catastrophic tipping point - unfortunately, only 55 percent believe they're doing enough to stop it, according to new research.

And results from the recent survey of 2,000 Americans found that a majority (82 percent) believe that carbon emissions play a major role in climate change.

The survey also found that while people are taking environmentally-friendly actions, a substantial number (44 percent) believe their actions are too small to help stop climate change and a third (32 percent) don't feel knowledgeable about the actions they can take.

Commissioned by Cool Effect and conducted by OnePoll in advance of Earth Day, the survey examined Americans' attitudes toward climate change, the actions they're taking and their thoughts regarding the future.

Americans' environmentally-friendly actions include turning off the lights (55 percent), using LED light bulbs (47 percent) and reusable bags (44 percent).

This is in addition to minimizing their electricity consumption (42 percent), using reusable water bottles (39 percent) and shopping locally or buying local produce (34 percent).

But is it enough?

According to a report released by the United Nations in October of 2018, we only have 12 years before climate change becomes catastrophic - 20 years less than the average respondent believes.

While Americans want to do more - with recycling more often (37 percent) at the top of the list, followed by planting trees (31 percent) and using eco-friendly household products (29 percent) - almost 60 percent of respondents do not currently purchase electricity from renewable energy, use solar panels or an electric car.

Less than 25 percent currently reduce their consumption of red meat or use public transport.

And over a quarter of respondents (27 percent) have no idea how many emissions they produce each year.

"Making daily eco-conscious choices is a step in the right direction, but our actions to reduce carbon need to be more significant: recycling is not enough.

You can have an outsized impact by switching to renewable energy and by supporting organizations around the world that are verifiably and measurably reducing carbon emissions like CoolEffect.org.

These include efforts like a U.S.-based grassland protection in the Great Plains or a clean cookstove initiative in Honduras that have been scientifically proven to reduce harmful carbon emissions," said Marisa de Belloy, CEO of non-profit Cool Effect.

In light of the United Nations report, over a third of respondents feel encouraged about our ability to make a change and 32 percent plan to step it up for Earth Day, with plans to be more environmentally friendly on the holiday than they typically are.

But one day is not enough.

To make a difference in the fight against climate change, respondents also believe that people need to think about climate change in every aspect of their lives (60 percent).

"The threats of climate change are very real, but we are also confident that with enough cumulative action, the average American can significantly reduce their carbon footprint.

While 31 percent of people said a barrier to fight climate change was that it is too expensive, and 27 percent didn't know how many emissions they produce each year, the solutions and education is out there.

With Cool Effect, you can offset your average yearly emissions of 16.6 tonnes for as little as $88," said de Belloy.

0
shares
ShareTweetSavePostSend
 

Can We Win The Battle Against Climate Change?

Climate change will soon reach a catastrophic tipping point - unfortunately, only 55 percent believe they're doing enough to stop it, according to new research.

And results from the recent survey of 2,000 Americans found that a majority (82 percent) believe that carbon emissions play a major role in climate change.

The survey also found that while people are taking environmentally-friendly actions, a substantial number (44 percent) believe their actions are too small to help stop climate change and a third (32 percent) don't feel knowledgeable about the actions they can take.

Commissioned by Cool Effect and conducted by OnePoll in advance of Earth Day, the survey examined Americans' attitudes toward climate change, the actions they're taking and their thoughts regarding the future.

Americans' environmentally-friendly actions include turning off the lights (55 percent), using LED light bulbs (47 percent) and reusable bags (44 percent).

This is in addition to minimizing their electricity consumption (42 percent), using reusable water bottles (39 percent) and shopping locally or buying local produce (34 percent).

But is it enough?

According to a report released by the United Nations in October of 2018, we only have 12 years before climate change becomes catastrophic - 20 years less than the average respondent believes.

While Americans want to do more - with recycling more often (37 percent) at the top of the list, followed by planting trees (31 percent) and using eco-friendly household products (29 percent) - almost 60 percent of respondents do not currently purchase electricity from renewable energy, use solar panels or an electric car.

Less than 25 percent currently reduce their consumption of red meat or use public transport.

And over a quarter of respondents (27 percent) have no idea how many emissions they produce each year.

"Making daily eco-conscious choices is a step in the right direction, but our actions to reduce carbon need to be more significant: recycling is not enough.

You can have an outsized impact by switching to renewable energy and by supporting organizations around the world that are verifiably and measurably reducing carbon emissions like CoolEffect.org.

These include efforts like a U.S.-based grassland protection in the Great Plains or a clean cookstove initiative in Honduras that have been scientifically proven to reduce harmful carbon emissions," said Marisa de Belloy, CEO of non-profit Cool Effect.

In light of the United Nations report, over a third of respondents feel encouraged about our ability to make a change and 32 percent plan to step it up for Earth Day, with plans to be more environmentally friendly on the holiday than they typically are.

But one day is not enough.

To make a difference in the fight against climate change, respondents also believe that people need to think about climate change in every aspect of their lives (60 percent).

"The threats of climate change are very real, but we are also confident that with enough cumulative action, the average American can significantly reduce their carbon footprint.

While 31 percent of people said a barrier to fight climate change was that it is too expensive, and 27 percent didn't know how many emissions they produce each year, the solutions and education is out there.

With Cool Effect, you can offset your average yearly emissions of 16.6 tonnes for as little as $88," said de Belloy.



Recent related news from verified sources

Fin24.com | Tim Cook says his generation has failed by over-debating climate change

The Apple chief executive told graduates at Tulane University in the US that his "generation has...
News24 - Published

Climate Change, Maternal Care And Parasitic Infection All Connected In South American Fur Seals

South American fur seal pups with high levels of hookworm infection spend more time in the water, but...
Eurasia Review - Published

‘Earthworm Dilemma’ Has Climate Scientists Racing to Keep Up

Worms are wriggling into Earth’s northernmost forests, creating major unknowns for climate-change...
NYTimes.com - Published

Freezing the damage

Having travelled around the world, including to the Arctic and Antarctic, to observe, collect and...
Bangkok Post - Published

Teachers grapple with climate change: 'A pretty scary topic'

When science teacher Diana Allen set out to teach climate change, a subject she'd never learned in...
SeattlePI.com - Published Also reported by •Seattle TimesMashable


Guardian Issues New Style Guide: ‘Climate Change’ Is Now ‘Climate Emergency’

Guardian Issues New Style Guide: ‘Climate Change’ Is Now ‘Climate Emergency’The Guardian has amended its official style guide addressing climate change in order to highlight...
The Wrap - Published Also reported by •FOXNews.com


AOC and Bernie Sanders rally against mediocre climate change action

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has delivered an impassioned speech about her Green New Deal to combat...
Mashable - Published

UN leader travels to Pacific to see climate change firsthand

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres says he's traveling to three...
SeattlePI.com - Published Also reported by •Seattle Times



You Might Like


Recent related videos from verified sources

Schwarzenegger Struck By Kicked Ball At South Africa Event [Video]Schwarzenegger Struck By Kicked Ball At South Africa Event

FILE PHOTO: Former California governor and 'Mr. Universe' Arnold Schwarzenegger attends the COP23 UN Climate Change Conference 2017, hosted by Fiji but held in Bonn, Germany, November 12, 2017...

Credit: Rumble     Duration: 00:33Published

Pollution impairing Asian summer monsoon , study finds [Video]Pollution impairing Asian summer monsoon , study finds

The Asian summer monsoon typically brings about a lot of rainfall, but scientists have found that the rate of precipitation has actually been declining over the past eight decades, according to a study..

Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me     Duration: 00:52Published

Tim Cook: "My generation has failed" on climate change [Video]Tim Cook: "My generation has failed" on climate change

While delivering a commencement speech at Tulane University on Saturday, Apple CEO Tim Cook told the graduating class his generation has failed on climate change. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

Credit: Rumble     Duration: 02:00Published

Nuclear 'coffin' could be leaking waste into the Pacific : UN chief [Video]Nuclear 'coffin' could be leaking waste into the Pacific : UN chief

RUNIT DOME, MARSHALL ISLANDS — UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres has raised concerns over a concrete dome in the Marshall Islands leaking radioactive waste into the Pacific Ocean. The nuclear..

Credit: TomoNews US     Duration: 01:34Published

Students Protest Mike Pence At Graduation Ceremony In Home State [Video]Students Protest Mike Pence At Graduation Ceremony In Home State

According to a report by Huffpost, on Saturday, dozens of members of Taylor University's graduating class protested Vice President Mike Pence's appearance as the school's commencement speaker, walking..

Credit: Wochit News     Duration: 00:40Published

Cities, states fight climate change [Video]Cities, states fight climate change

WISN12’s Matt Smith reports that eight Wisconsin cities have joined a mayoral climate alliance, looking to take some action to fight climate change.

Credit: WISN     Duration: 03:46Published

TedXSalon Series talks about ways to discuss climate change [Video]TedXSalon Series talks about ways to discuss climate change

We're doomed... maybe.

Credit: WKBTPublished

These Australian Islands Are Covered In Plastics [Video]These Australian Islands Are Covered In Plastics

The remote Cocos Islands are home to 238 tons of plastic waste.

Credit: Celebrity Wire     Duration: 01:12Published

Environmentally friendly: One News Page is hosted on servers powered solely by renewable energy
© 2019 One News Page Ltd. All Rights Reserved.
About us  |  Contact us  |  Disclaimer  |  Press Room  |  Terms & Conditions  |  Content Accreditation
 RSS  |  News for my Website  |  Free news search widget  |  In the News  |  DMCA / Content Removal  |  Privacy & Data Protection Policy
How are we doing? FeedbackSend us your feedback  |   LIKE us on Facebook   FOLLOW us on Twitter  •  FOLLOW us on Pinterest
One News® is a registered trademark of One News Page Ltd.