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Vallance: Coronavirus outcome in UK hasn't been good

Video Credit: PA - Press Association STUDIO - Duration: 01:03s - Published
Vallance: Coronavirus outcome in UK hasn't been good

Vallance: Coronavirus outcome in UK hasn't been good

The outcome of the coronavirus pandemic in the UK “has not been good”, the Government’s chief scientific adviser said.Sir Patrick Vallance told the Science and Technology Committee there will be “many factors” that determine how well countries respond to the outbreak.He said: “As (chief medical officer Professor) Chris Whitty has said before, it’s very difficult to know where we stand at the moment.“It’s clear that the outcome has not been good in the UK, I think you can be absolutely clear about that."

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Patrick Vallance Patrick Vallance British medical doctor


Chris Whitty Chris Whitty British physician and epidemiologist

Chris Whitty: We have probably reached the limit of what we can do [Video]

Chris Whitty: We have probably reached the limit of what we can do

England's chief medical officer, Prof Chris Whitty, warned the nation had"probably reached near the limit or the limits" of what can be done to reopensociety, meaning trade-offs may be needed to allow pupils to return toclassrooms next month as planned. Professor Graham Medley, a member of theScientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage), said ministers might have toconsider closing pubs in England in order for lessons to start again nextmonth.

Credit: PA - Press Association STUDIO    Duration: 01:17Published
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Credit: PA - Press Association STUDIO    Duration: 01:58Published
Chris Whitty: We may have to change Covid-19 strategy in winter [Video]

Chris Whitty: We may have to change Covid-19 strategy in winter

Professor Chris Whitty told the Lords Science and Technology Committee that it is not yet known what measures for keeping the virus at bay will be most effective in the winter.England's chief medical officer said getting the balance right between protecting the country and protecting the economy is key for further easing of restrictions but the approach might change at the end of the year.

Credit: PA - Press Association STUDIO    Duration: 01:40Published
Whitty: 'Second wave' still very much a possibility [Video]

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At a Government coronavirus press conference, Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty says that a second wave of Covid-19 cases is still possible and urges the public to remain alert.

Credit: PA - Press Association STUDIO    Duration: 01:01Published

Coronavirus Coronavirus Subfamily of viruses in the family Coronaviridae

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Alcoholism treatment is potentially effective against COVID-19 [Video]

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A team of chemists from HSE University and the Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry used molecular modelling to find out that two medications that have been known for a long time can be used to fight SARS-CoV-2. These are disulfiram, which is used to treat alcoholism, and neratinib, an experimental drug being used to treat breast cancer. The paper about the discovery has been published online in the 4th issue of Mendeleev Communications journal.The structural elements of the virus that are less subject to mutation during its evolution should be chosen as a target for the potential treatment. Otherwise, a medication effective against one strain would no longer be effective against another. The best candidates for this are conservative proteins, such as the SARS-CoV-2 virus main protease M pro. In addition to being resistant to mutations, M pro plays a major role in coronavirusreplication, which means that its inhibition (blocking its function) is able to slow down or even completely stop its reproduction inside the body.Usually, the process of docking, as with a port dock and a ship entering it, is used for molecular modelling in simple cases. Two molecules participate in docking. One is called a 'ligand' (here, it is a medicine), and the other one is 'receptor' (or active site) of the target protein, such as Mpro, which can be used to 'dock'. An effective drug docks with the active site, by covalent links, which makes the enzyme dysfunctional or destroys it. But classical docking does not work in SARS-CoV-2.To overcome this problem, chemists from HSE University and the Zelinsky Institute decided to use 'on-top docking', which they came up with shortly before the pandemic. 'We decided not to focus on the previously described active site, but to investigate the whole surface of M pro protein with many medications, hoping that the big calculation powers would return useful "dockings",' - said Igor Svitanko, the author of the article,Professor at the HSE Joint Department of Organic Chemistry with the RAS Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry.

Credit: ANI    Duration: 01:10Published
Health experts warn U.S. cities of 'trouble ahead' [Video]

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White House health experts are warning of a slow rise in the percentage of people testing positive for coronavirus in U.S. cities such as Boston, Chicago, Detroit and Washington and urged local leaders to remain vigilant to avoid a surge. Lisa Bernhard produced this report.

Credit: Reuters - Politics    Duration: 02:19Published

Science and Technology Select Committee select committee of the House of Commons in the Parliament of the United Kingdom

Deaths 'could have been halved' with earlier lockdown [Video]

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Former Government adviser Professor Neil Ferguson has told the Science and Technology Committee that if the UK had introduced lockdown measures a week earlier, the death toll may have been reduced "by at least a half". Report by Etemadil. Like us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/itn and follow us on Twitter at http://twitter.com/itn

Credit: ODN    Duration: 00:41Published

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