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Researchers Find Light Frequency That Kills COVID-19 Virus Without Harming Humans

Video Credit: Wochit News - Duration: 00:38s - Published
Researchers Find Light Frequency That Kills COVID-19 Virus Without Harming Humans

Researchers Find Light Frequency That Kills COVID-19 Virus Without Harming Humans

Gizmodo reports scientists have discovered a specific wavelength of UV light that’s both safe for people and can kill coronaviruses, both on surfaces and in the air.

Researchers from Columbia University and Japan's Hiroshima University, have found that a UVC light wave of 222 nanometers does the trick.

It's unable to penetrate the eye’s tear layer or the dead-cell layer of skin, preventing it from reaching and damaging living cells in the human body.


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Gizmodo Gizmodo Design, technology, science, and science fiction website and blog

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Credit: Wochit News    Duration: 00:39Published
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Credit: Wochit News    Duration: 00:36Published

Columbia University Columbia University Private Ivy League research university in New York City

Comparative study reveals hospitalized COVID-19 patients have less comorbidity than Influenza patients [Video]

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Credit: ANI    Duration: 01:25Published

Hiroshima University Hiroshima University higher education institution in Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan


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