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Two gannets rescued after tangled in fishing rope

Video Credit: SWNS STUDIO - Duration: 01:25s - Published
Two gannets rescued after tangled in fishing rope

Two gannets rescued after tangled in fishing rope

This is the dramatic moment two gannets had to be rescued - after they became entangled in fishing rope.Phil Harris, 44, and Richard Shucksmith, 45, swooped to rescue the stricken birds after spotting blue fishing gear knotted around their beaks and wings. The wildlife enthusiasts were running a boat tour for visitors around the uninhabited Isle of Noss, Shetland, when they saw the distressed birds.They used a boat hook to haul the seabirds onto the boat where Phil, who has experience as a bird ringer, took hold of the gannets while Richard cut them free.The birds flew away once they were freed but Richard, a wildlife photographer, said they would have died a 'long painful death' floating on the ocean if they hadn't spotted them. Horrified Richard, a dad-of-two, said the incident was just another example of pollution at sea and called on fishermen to be more cautious disposing of rope. Richard, from South Nesting, Shetland, said: "This is a great example of the pollution at sea."I think the fisherman need to be more careful."I have nothing against the fishing industry but how hard is it to just keep your rope and throw it in a bin elsewhere."This is a problem that is easy to solve."It's the same thing with plastic."There is nothing wrong with plastic but it's where the plastic ends up that becomes the problem."Gannets are the largest seabirds in the North Atlantic and can have a wingspan of up to two metres.The beaks are sharp and despite having experience with the birds, Phil, from Lerwick, Shetland said they had a few cuts from removing the rope last week, on August 26.Dad-of-two Phil, who runs Shetland Seabird Tours, said: "We were taking an Italian couple to the gannets."I found the birds wrapped up in fishing rope."I just wanted to help them."I had to move the boat beside them as quick as possible because they kept trying to run away."On this occasion, we were dealing with two birds which means it was more dangerous."If you are not careful they will try and poke your eyes, that is how defensive they can be."They are also very strong so that is why I had to hold their heads tightly to avoid an accident."But we did leave with a few cuts on our hands because of how sharp their beaks are."

This is the dramatic moment two gannets had to be rescued - after they became entangled in fishing rope.Phil Harris, 44, and Richard Shucksmith, 45, swooped to rescue the stricken birds after spotting blue fishing gear knotted around their beaks and wings.

The wildlife enthusiasts were running a boat tour for visitors around the uninhabited Isle of Noss, Shetland, when they saw the distressed birds.They used a boat hook to haul the seabirds onto the boat where Phil, who has experience as a bird ringer, took hold of the gannets while Richard cut them free.The birds flew away once they were freed but Richard, a wildlife photographer, said they would have died a 'long painful death' floating on the ocean if they hadn't spotted them.

Horrified Richard, a dad-of-two, said the incident was just another example of pollution at sea and called on fishermen to be more cautious disposing of rope.

Richard, from South Nesting, Shetland, said: "This is a great example of the pollution at sea."I think the fisherman need to be more careful."I have nothing against the fishing industry but how hard is it to just keep your rope and throw it in a bin elsewhere."This is a problem that is easy to solve."It's the same thing with plastic."There is nothing wrong with plastic but it's where the plastic ends up that becomes the problem."Gannets are the largest seabirds in the North Atlantic and can have a wingspan of up to two metres.The beaks are sharp and despite having experience with the birds, Phil, from Lerwick, Shetland said they had a few cuts from removing the rope last week, on August 26.Dad-of-two Phil, who runs Shetland Seabird Tours, said: "We were taking an Italian couple to the gannets."I found the birds wrapped up in fishing rope."I just wanted to help them."I had to move the boat beside them as quick as possible because they kept trying to run away."On this occasion, we were dealing with two birds which means it was more dangerous."If you are not careful they will try and poke your eyes, that is how defensive they can be."They are also very strong so that is why I had to hold their heads tightly to avoid an accident."But we did leave with a few cuts on our hands because of how sharp their beaks are."




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