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How Americans have been supporting small businesses during the coronavirus lockdown

Video Credit: SWNS STUDIO - Duration: 01:05s - Published
How Americans have been supporting small businesses during the coronavirus lockdown

How Americans have been supporting small businesses during the coronavirus lockdown

With all 50 states beginning at least some form of a partial reopening this week, new research finds 67% of Americans feel more optimistic and are looking to support small businesses.A poll of 2,000 Americans discovered that 75% plan on making a bigger effort to support small businesses.The average American even plans to spend nearly $100 a week at local businesses post-COVID-19.According to the survey, people plan to increase their average weekly spending at small businesses by 16% — in the hopes of boosting their local economy.The Groupon study, conducted by OnePoll, aimed to uncover how Americans are supporting local businesses within their communities and found 86% have gone out of their way to support a local business while in quarantine.And 57% even know of at least one establishment affected by lockdown restrictions.Some of the top ways people have showed their support during quarantine include taking an online class or participating in a virtual experience offered by a local merchant (77%), booking summer "staycations" — revolving around activities that are close to home and keep their kids entertained (65%) and ordering more takeout and delivery from local restaurants (60%).Americans miss the simple things in life while quarantined.

While going to restaurants and movies topped the list of things people missed the most, and 21% missed their weekly brunch outings.Amidst the quarantine, 44% reveal they have already tried a virtual workout or exercise class."This crisis has disproportionately affected small businesses and our hearts go out to local merchants, who have often poured their life savings into their businesses," said Simon Goodall, Chief Commercial Officer, Groupon.

"As some businesses begin to slowly and responsibly open back up, it's encouraging to see that many Americans plan to continue to help their communities recover by supporting small, local businesses.

Even if you live in an area that hasn't relaxed restrictions or you don't feel that it's safe to support them in person just yet, there are still a number of meaningful ways that you can make a huge difference right now such as taking an online class, ordering takeout or delivery and booking future plans." With so many local businesses closed down, Americans attempted to do some things on their own that they normally would pay somebody for.Whether it's cutting their own hair, giving themselves a manicure, or cooking a restaurant-quality meal, it only took the average person 12 days in isolation before putting their own skills to the test. Over a quarter (27%) had an unsuccessful experience at coloring their hair while a further 24% unsuccessfully attempted to give themselves a pedicure.And as expected, one in four had experienced an instantly regrettable haircut from a friend or family member. Twenty-six percent of respondents failed at their body piercing attempts during quarantine and another 22% failed to bake a delicious treat during quarantine.One person broke a window using the vacuum cleaner while another woman said she went so long without wearing a bra, that when she put one back on she mistakenly thought she was having a heart attack.And with nine out of 10 people saying they felt bored in quarantine, Americans said eating at restaurants, going to the movies, seeing friends, spending time with family and friends and getting brunch are the biggest things missing from their social lives."While we are rapidly adjusting our business to implement a number of new safety measures including aggressive sanitizing and educating our members on best practices, we are incredibly excited to be back at work," said Katie Stumbo, owner and founder of Phoenix's Go Conquer Fitness.

"The new normal certainly creates some challenges for a small business, so we really appreciate the support of our local community as we reopen our doors."  

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With all 50 states beginning at least some form of a partial reopening this week, new research finds 67% of Americans feel more optimistic and are looking to support small businesses.A poll of 2,000 Americans discovered that 75% plan on making a bigger effort to support small businesses.The average American even plans to spend nearly $100 a week at local businesses post-COVID-19.According to the survey, people plan to increase their average weekly spending at small businesses by 16% — in the hopes of boosting their local economy.The Groupon study, conducted by OnePoll, aimed to uncover how Americans are supporting local businesses within their communities and found 86% have gone out of their way to support a local business while in quarantine.And 57% even know of at least one establishment affected by lockdown restrictions.Some of the top ways people have showed their support during quarantine include taking an online class or participating in a virtual experience offered by a local merchant (77%), booking summer "staycations" — revolving around activities that are close to home and keep their kids entertained (65%) and ordering more takeout and delivery from local restaurants (60%).Americans miss the simple things in life while quarantined.

While going to restaurants and movies topped the list of things people missed the most, and 21% missed their weekly brunch outings.Amidst the quarantine, 44% reveal they have already tried a virtual workout or exercise class."This crisis has disproportionately affected small businesses and our hearts go out to local merchants, who have often poured their life savings into their businesses," said Simon Goodall, Chief Commercial Officer, Groupon.

"As some businesses begin to slowly and responsibly open back up, it's encouraging to see that many Americans plan to continue to help their communities recover by supporting small, local businesses.

Even if you live in an area that hasn't relaxed restrictions or you don't feel that it's safe to support them in person just yet, there are still a number of meaningful ways that you can make a huge difference right now such as taking an online class, ordering takeout or delivery and booking future plans." With so many local businesses closed down, Americans attempted to do some things on their own that they normally would pay somebody for.Whether it's cutting their own hair, giving themselves a manicure, or cooking a restaurant-quality meal, it only took the average person 12 days in isolation before putting their own skills to the test.

Over a quarter (27%) had an unsuccessful experience at coloring their hair while a further 24% unsuccessfully attempted to give themselves a pedicure.And as expected, one in four had experienced an instantly regrettable haircut from a friend or family member.

Twenty-six percent of respondents failed at their body piercing attempts during quarantine and another 22% failed to bake a delicious treat during quarantine.One person broke a window using the vacuum cleaner while another woman said she went so long without wearing a bra, that when she put one back on she mistakenly thought she was having a heart attack.And with nine out of 10 people saying they felt bored in quarantine, Americans said eating at restaurants, going to the movies, seeing friends, spending time with family and friends and getting brunch are the biggest things missing from their social lives."While we are rapidly adjusting our business to implement a number of new safety measures including aggressive sanitizing and educating our members on best practices, we are incredibly excited to be back at work," said Katie Stumbo, owner and founder of Phoenix's Go Conquer Fitness.

"The new normal certainly creates some challenges for a small business, so we really appreciate the support of our local community as we reopen our doors."  




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