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MidMorning With Aundrea 04/17/18

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News video: MidMorning With Aundrea 04/17/18Break away from your everyday with Aundrea Self! Today,

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MidMorning With Aundrea 04/17/18

the better business bureau warns millenials to be on guard against scammers. and, a new york city caf? says come on in and brind you furry friend. plus, a note to self with a united state senator. midmorning starts right now. a new report finds more computers are being seized by hackers. the information is held hostage unless the owner pays up. danielle nottingham explains. atlanta continues to recover from an attack that crippled the city's computer network.

"the city of atlanta has experienced a ransomware cyber attack." last month officials revealed that hackers encrypted the city's data and demanded 51- thousand dollars in bitcoin to give it back. city agencies, from law enforcement to the courts, couldn't access their computers. these type of attacks are growing worldwide... with hackers sending out a warning like this one to governments, busineses and consumers. verizon's annual data breach investigations report found ransomware cases doubled two years in a row... making it the most popular type of malware attack.

"the reason it's become so popular is that it's relatively easy for criminals to do." chris novak helped author the report and says many times hackers are able to infiltrate a corporation or government system because an employee let's them in.

"they click on a link in an email or they open an attachment they shouldn't have and as a result their system gets infected and the ransomware takes hold." criminals often don't ask for a lot of money. 300 dollars was the demand made during last year's global ransomware attack. organized crime operations from overseas are often behind the scams that ask for payment in untraceable crypto currency.

"you're negotiating with criminals so there's no guarantee that you pay the ransom and that you're going to get anythign back at all. i've seen organizations pay and then they hear silence." novak says the best defense is to regularly back up your data... so it can be restored without having to pay a ransom. danielle nottingham, cbs news, los angeles. no one knows if the city of atlanta has paid the ransom. they aren't saying. but the city has reportedly hired security firms to restore the computer systems young people spend a lot of time on line. and, now new information from the better business bureau shows scammers are tricking millennials at a higher rate. and one reason, is because they tend to be too trusting. last summer, jaclyn woodard walked down the aisle...but shortly before her wedding day, she was in a panic...because someone tricked her into sending them 700 dollars.

"they acted like my cousin." she says the scammer stole her cousinús online identity, and sent her a facebook message. they pointed her to a man who was supposedgly giving out grants, and he said woodard needed to put some money down, to get money back.

"i think one was an itunes, an itunes card." "did you ever get anything back?" "nope, nope." woodard reported the scam to the bbb, through their online scam tracker. sheús not the only one. according to this report on the agencyús 2017 data, people jaclynús age are falling for scams all the time. the bbb received nearly 48- thousand scam reports last year. nearly half, 44-percent, came from people 18 to 34 years old. and of those, more than 70-percent said theyúd been scammed online. in fact, online purchases ranked as the number one riskiest scam.

"what weúre finding is that millennials are accustomed to being on the internet, they trust the internet, they give a lot of their personal information on the internet." tim maniscalo, who runs central indianaús bbb office, says woodardús case has a lot of classic signs of a scam - like putting money down to get money back, paying in unusual ways like gift cards, and getting a message out of the blue. he says the best defense is for more people like jaclyn to report a scam, whether they fall for it or not. in her case, the scammer reached out months later through email, and tried to get her to fall for it a second time.

"i was like, iúm reporting you and iúm blocking you." you can report scams on the bbbús website through their scam tracker tool. you can also report to the federal trade commission dozens of firefighters are killed each year in the line of duty -- and thousands more are injured. many also suffer invisible wounds -- including post- traumatic stress disorder. chip reid visited a new center in maryland where they can get treatment. firefighters have one of the most dangerous jobs in the world. nats but responding to every imaginable kind of tragedy also takes an emotional toll. ááááthere were two teenagers in a car and they slid off the road, upside down and into a telephone pole sideways. i apologize, bear with me. former fire fighter and paramedic scott russell remembers the day when it became too much to bear. i sat under there for 20 minutes as we tried to get all this metal off of her and told her, held her hand // i want to get you out of here. the teenage girl didn't survive. russell couldn't sleep, started drinking heavily, and kept it all inside. he made a plan to commit suicide. i'm sitting in the basement crying, crying a puddle of tears. 002404 ááááácr: did you ever think ptsd? sr: no. i had no idea // i heard ptsd and that is what happens when you go to war. finally, he talked to a counselor and discovered he'd been living a first responder's version of war. we talk about the military on the front lines, these are the people on the domestic front lines. dr. abby morris, a psychiatrist, is medical director of a new first- of-its-kind center in maryland for firefighters struggling with ptsd. we call 911 they come. who do they call? // we wanted to be their 911. there are 60 beds, and treatment lasts 30 to 60 days, with 18 months of follow-up. one in five fire fighters and paramedics will suffer from ptsd during their career. but 92 percent say stigma is a barrier to seeking treatment. they tend to stuff it down. this center was the brainchild of harold schaitberger, president of the international association of fire fighters. we are working to break that stigma away to help our members know they should come out of the shadows and seek help and treatment. russell says that was the hardest part of all. because we want to be that hero for the rest of the world. a world that needs its heroes to take care of themselves, too. chip reid, cbs news, upper marlboro, maryland this is the week of the boston marathon. five years ago, two bombs went off near the finish line -- killing three people, and injuring more than 250 -- including the couple you're about to meet. don dahler caught up with them -- and their special friend. it's a special day for the students at john f. kennedy elementary school in somerville, massachusetts. they get to meet a highly-trained service dog named rescue, and ask questions about what it's like to need one. but here's the question that has taken patrick downes and jessica kensky five years to answer: what does it take to get over the worst day of your life? countless surgeries. years of rehabilitation. courage. pain. a supportive family. devoted friends. and a very special dog, with a goofy sense of humor. he just makes us laugh all the time. jessica and patrick were newlyweds when the marathon bombings robbed them of their legs. . . robbed them of their first year of marriage. forced them to endure despair, hopelessness, and anger. it's been an exhausting, emotional investment for both of us. we've had to work really hard in individual therapy, in couples therapy, to make sense of all this. rescue came into their lives six months after the bombing, and immediately give jessica a sense of independence and comfort. yet she continued to struggle with the idea of giving up her irreparable second leg. d: you seem to be in a good place. j: oh by far the best i've been, for sure. finally, after years of agony, jessica agreed to have that leg amputated as well. j: i'm not in constant pain and i think that's a big piece of it. chronic constant pain changes your whole personality. right? i'm nicer now? now, they have a new children's book about the bond between human and service dog, entitled "rescue and jessica, a life changing friendship", and are touring schools around the country, talking about their experiences. d: you have been through enough to write a grownup book, why a children's book? p: because it's so fun! the book never mentions the boston marathon bombings, but neither does it shy away from the dark place jessica, who takes the form of a young girl in the book, found herself in. and how she was literally rescued by love. we're hoping kids are going to stare at these pictures. we want them to ask questions of this book. i think we're trying to give parents a tool to navigate discussions with people who look different, who get around differently. talk about inclusion and compassion and teamwork. jessica says their black lab was aptly named. but he had a lot of help. he's just softened every rough edge and brightened every dark moment. i call him my best medicine. rescue's unbounded, unconditional loyalty to jessica is so beautiful. he will do anything for her. to us, he's also the embodiment of all the people who have come into our lives the last five years and have done anything for us. the lesson today for the kids of john f. kennedy elementary school? even in your darkest times, there will always be someone there to help. don dahler, cbs news, boston. when we come back, sharing a coffee with your pup. mid morning will return in a moment. there's ride sharing. there's also rental bike sharing. so-called "dockless" bikes have offered an inexpensive and convenient way to commute in urban areas and now startups are expanding their fleets. danielle nottingham tells us why the trend is also creating a headache for local communities. from california&amp; to the nation's capital&amp;commute rs like luke rosche-ritchie are riding electric scooters.

"i like the dockless, you can drop it wherever and hopefully find one when you need one" dockless scooters, just like dockless bikes, allow users to leave the rental wherever they end their trip instead of returning them to a docking station.

"danielle: this is all done with your smartphone? zack: that is correct" zack bartlett with limebike says you locate a scooter through an app, scan the qr code to unlock it and ride. scooter and bike sharing has become so popular, start ups like limebike, bird and ofo have racked up millions of rides across the country.

"in just under 9 months we've seen over 50 markets" "the technology's success has also come with growing pains as complaints pile up over user etiquette" bikes scattered on sidewalks and street corners have pushed towns like highland park, texas and coronado, ca to restrict their use. now some believe scooters could be the next nuissance.

"the scooter in the middle of the sidewalk with swaths of people, it can be really annoying" cities like san francisco are sending out warnings.

"if they want to continue this level of arrogance we'll impound their scooters and send them packing" limebike says it uses online tutorials to teach customers how to be responsible.

' user education is very important to us, because we understand this is a new technology and we want to make sure people a know how to ride it safe b know how to park it responsibly with the average cost of bikes and scooters starting at a couple of dollars an hour..riders say you can't beat the convenience. danielle nottingham cbs news los angeles. car ride share giant uber is joining the trend. it recently purchased dockless bike share start up jump. the first "dog cafe" has opened in new york city which means customers can sip coffee with their canines. as laura podesta reports, this is a growing trend. across the country, more restaurants are allowing pets indoors - to attract customers. at boris &amp; horton in new york city the seats.... and treats... are not just for humans.

"i have coffee. colonel has donuts and biscuits and stuff like that." "there ya go!" co-owner logan mikhly says she followed strict rules and regulations by the health department to open new york's very first dog- friendly cafe.

"laura podesta: are dogs ever allowed in here? logan/co-owner: absolutely not. no dogs at the coffee bar!" food is prepared in an area completely separate from the playroom. this set up is similar to other caf?s that have opened their doors to pets. cat caf?s originated in asia and have been popping up across the us, including in utah, texas, and virginia. homeless cats live at the locations and wait to be adopted by visitors. the first caf? for dogs opened in los angeles in 2016 with the same concept. at boris &amp; horton, the policy is b.y.o.d. - bring your own dog. but you'll find plenty of people who are here without a pet, just to enjoy the atmosphere.

"i can meet up with my friends who have dogs and i can spend time with them, which i really enjoy, especially not having my own dog, i love to pet and cuddle with other dogs. the coffee shop is such a hit, the company plans to expand.

"we're looking at other locations throughout new york, manhattan and brooklyn." for dogs and dog lovers everywhere, that's something to bark about. laura podesta, cbs news, new york. it is a sound he thought he would never hear again. but then again, pat quinn never says never. his story ahead on thanks to a new device, the man who inspired the a-l-s ice bucket challenge has gotten his voice back. richard giacovas reports. the sound of birds chirping and the breathtaking views of the hudson river was probably the biggest highlight in pat quinn's life since being diagnosed with als 5 years ago. that is until he could hear his own voice again. pat quinn/als survivor: "i was blown away." pat's smile says it all. the yonkers native who inspired the ice bucket challenge would avoid speaking at public events or even family once he lost his ability to speak. mostly because he didn't want to sound like a "computer." but a few days ago he was given this device by the als association. it's changed his life. pat quinn/als survivor: "it's a very tough disease but you do what you can do." that was pat's voice when the ice bucket challenge launched nearly three years ago. now he's back... pat quinn/als survivor: "i plan on getting back out there and speaking to people. i want to inspire people to live every day." sounding stronger than ever through a device that picks up pat's exact voice and his inflections...by matching it to speeches and interviews pat has done over the past few years. pat quinn/als survivor: "whatever it takes to keep making a difference, change this disease and hopefully inspire people along the way." richard giacovas/reporting: "and you may be wondering how pat controls this device...well it's all through the motion of his eyes." and pat's eyes have never been brighter as he keeps hope alive every day...never even giving a thought to stop fighting. pat quinn/als survivor: "hope is everything and it keeps me going." a hope that is stronger than ever. pat quinn/als survivor: "fired up" if you could go back, and give yourself advice, what would it be, a note to self ahead on mid morning senator tammy duckworth is now the áfirstá u- s- senator to give birth while in office. maile pearl bowlsbey was born last week. she is the second child of senator duckworth and her husband, joining big sister abigail. soon after her delivery, senator duckworth tweeted, thanking the medical teams for helping in her decades- long journey to complete her family. before she gave birth to maile, the 50 year old double amputee and junior senator from illinois reflected on some of her life's milestones, in this note to her younger self. dear tammy- i know you're busy focusing on acing that test or winning that next track medal, but i want you to take a step back. no matter how hard you try- and you will tear yourself up inside trying-you never will achieve that 4.0 gpa and you'll never be that high school track star that you wanted you to be. but you'll learn that perfection isn't what matters. it's how you respond to hardship and failure that defines you. you'll see it in your daddy's eyes when his failure to prepare, make tough decisions or set his ego aside leads to years of struggle for your family. you'll be hungry, relying on food stamps to feed yourselves. you'll be nearly homeless, having lost almost everything important to you. but you'll see how your family works to recover. you'll learn that gratitude is essential, and you'll learn how to survive a tough time-which is good, because you're going to need that skill again. you'll join the army, and you will have two very different lives. your first will be on a path towards a happy life and happy family, with achievements in the military and a chance to travel and see the world. but that wonderful life will end so abruptly it'll feel like a death, and it will put all the rest of your plans-for your family, for your career-on life support. you will almost die, but you'll make it-just barely. your survival won't have anything to do with your own abilities- you'll make it out alive completely because of the grit, sacrifice and outright heroism of others. you haven't done anything to be worthy of their sacrifices, but these heroes will give you a second chance at life anyway. your second life begins when you wake up a few days later in agony. non-stop, unrelenting, seemingly- endless agony. but you will reemerge. sure, you'll be angry, vengeful and scared but, most of all, you'll dig into the deepest part of you and find a way to survive it. you'll be so grateful and proud not just of your husband who becomes your champion, but of all those who sacrificed to keep you alive. you'll have to learn to walk, eat, bathe, and do everything else again by falling, crawling and pulling yourself back up. you'll remember that you are a soldier and that you will never give up, never abandon the mission and that as an officer, it is your responsibility to care for your troops. because of that mission, you'll meet a powerful man, senator dick durbin, who, instead of seeing someone pitiful and broken in a wheelchair, sees you as someone who can help make your nation better. he'll challenge you to once again serve your nation, but this time by running for congress. you'll fail. you'll lose the race. but this time, instead of just a personal failure like a bad grade or a swing and strike, the world will know that you failed. but somehow, it won't be as devastating as it would have been in your first life. just a few years later, you'll find yourself in the best position you've ever been in to repay those who sacrificed for to save you. you'll be a united for to save you. you'll be a united states senator. you'll see the difference you can make in people's lives- your achievements now can actually make the nation you love a more perfect union. and you'll be proud of it all- but as happy as you are to be able to help people, the best part of your second life will be you finally getting to have the family you've always wanted. senator tammy duckworth we'll be right back to wrap things




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